Roy Emerson Museum

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Statue of Roy Emerson, born in Blackbutt, Queensland, an Australian tennis player who won 12 major singles titles between 1961 to 1967 and still holds the most titles won in men's tennis

Roy Emerson, born in Blackbutt, Queensland, was an Australian tennis player who won 12 major singles titles between 1961 and 1967, the first against fellow Australian tennis player Rod Laver. He also won 16 grand slam doubles titles between 1959 and 1971, including two with Rod Laver.

Roy Emerson (as of 2018) has the 4th highest number of grand slam titles, after Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, and Pete Sampras. He held the most grand slam titles from 1967 until 2000 when Pete Sampras won his 13th grand slam.

Roy Emerson still holds the most Australian singles titles, equal with Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer, and the most French doubles titles. Roy Emerson holds the most overall titles in men’s tennis with a title of 28, followed next by Roger Federer with 20.

The most tennis titles, however, is held by Australian Margaret Court with 64, whom the Margaret Court Arena in Melbourne is named after. Roy Emerson has a tennis stadium in Gstaad, Switzerland named after him, the Roy Emerson Arena, where he won five times and played his last professional match.

The museum building was the original Nukku State School, gifted to the Blackbutt and District Tourism and Heritage Association in 2011. It was relocated to where the Blackbutt railhead was, next to the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail in Blackbutt.

The building became the Roy Emerson Museum. The museum contains lots of photos and articles relating to the history of Blackbutt and surrounding areas, including the history of the Nukku State School.

Roy Emerson attended the Nukku school for all of his primary schooling and side of the museum is dedicated to Roy Emerson.

In recognition of Roy Emerson’s achievements, a bronze statue was built and placed beside the museum, unveiled in 2017 by Roy himself.

On the other side of the museum, is the Nukku railway siding, which also fits in with the theme of the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail. Some track has been laid next to the siding in hope of a carriage to be acquired and placed next to it, but this has not yet happened.

A small playground and a skate park is next to the museum. A water fountain and tap is along the fence next to the skate park.

To get there:

Brown sign for Roy Emerson MuseumComing into Blackbutt from the west on D’Aguilar Hwy, turn left into Muir St immediately after crossing the creek at the brown sign for the museum. After 150m, the entrance to the museum is on the opposite corner when Muir St narrows into Morris St, the same entrance for Brisbane Valley Rail Trail.

Coming into Blackbutt from the east on D’Aguilar Hwy, drive into town where the road becomes divided. After 250m, turn right into Muir St at the brown sign for the museum, before crossing over the creek. After 150m, the entrance to the museum is on the opposite corner when Muir St narrows into Morris St, the same entrance for Brisbane Valley Rail Trail.

Cost: Gold coin donation

Hours: Mon-Sun 10am-2pm

Toilets: No

Bins: No

Tables: No

Seating: Yes, seats inside the museum

Water: Yes, next to the skate park

Food: No

Wheelchair accessible: Yes

Pets: No

BBQ: No

Playground: Yes


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